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JASON SILVERMAN CHOWDER BOWL
JASON SILVERMAN CHOWDER BOWL
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JASON SILVERMAN CHOWDER BOWL

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$44.00
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$44.00
Regular price
$44.00
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JASON SILVERMAN CERAMICS CHOWDER MUG

HANDMADE in the USA

With a convenient handle, this bowl will be a must have for you.   Soups, salads or side dishes will look and taste sublime in this generously sized and beautiful bowl. Perhaps a giant serving of ice cream and toppings? And personally I love it for cereal or a small bowl of leftover pasta. 

  Water BLUE

Each piece is hand thrown.
Approximate Dimensions

Diameter:6”

Height:  3”

Due to the handmade nature of these items, there will be slight variation in size & glaze color. Photograph may not be the exact item we have in stock. We will always choose the best piece on hand to fill your order, but it may not be an exact copy of what you see in the images.

Care & Use: Microwave, dishwasher and oven safe and of course lead-free. Uneven heating and extreme temperature changes must be avoided. Never put pottery on stovetop, over open flame or in the freezer. Pottery should be pre-heated with oven and not placed inside a hot oven.
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"I took my first pottery class when I was 19," Jason tells us. "I always wanted to try it. As soon as I was halfway into my first attempt at throwing on the wheel, I was hooked. I remember thinking: 'This is it.' From that moment on, I had no choice; I was going to be a potter."

Rhode Island School of Design trained artist Jason Silverman creates forms on the wheel with a combination of traditional techniques and his own contemporary vision. He has been influenced greatly by Chinese Chun Dynasty pottery's forms and glazes. At the same time he draws from many modern sources in ceramics as well as other media such as blown glass and turned wood. At the Rhode Island School of Design he gained the technical ability and training that freed him to articulate his innate aesthetic vision through his ceramic forms and surfaces. The act of throwing, forming the clay on the wheel, is only the first step in the complex process of matching both form and glaze to an aesthetic vision — developing original glazes can be tedious, tricky, and volatile.
Jason adds: "I see the balance of function and beauty as an underlying guide to all of my pottery, from the most common cereal bowl to the most decorative vase."